MORAL OREL?

Photo From examiner.com

Photo From examiner.com

This is an article which I posted on Feb 14th, 2010 on the Wings of the Wind News Blog.  I thought it was interesting enough to repost.  I found it quite amazing how many folks would defend this kind of stuff.  This is a display of how sad and angry many Americans are in our day.  It is, indeed, a sign of the times.

CR

‘Moral Orel,’ Cartoon Network’s assault on Christ

Wilmington Religion & Politics Examiner /Keith Wimer

The evolution of animated features, running parallel with the devolution of traditional, Judeo-Christian values in American society, has sunk to an all-time low as exemplified by the Cartoon Network’s series “Moral Orel,” created by Dino Stamatopoulos, also known for contributions to The Ben Stiller Show and Mr. Show.

“Orel,” named for its main character, Orel Puppington, a young boy from a monumentally dysfunctional family, dishes on the claymationDavey and Goliath” motif, sans the faithful canine companion. But this stop-action cartoon is, mildly putting it, the antithesis of its Lutheran Church produced counterpart.

Photo from examiner.com

Photo from examiner.com

The new matrix of the popular 1950’s & 60’s children’s television series has a “moral” message to be sure. But where Davey’s adventures delivered perhaps a watered-down, sometimes oversimplified, yet interminably positive dramatization of Christian teachings, “Orel” is a dark descent into animated hyper-sexuality, violence, and most of all, blasphemy. The type of which must surely have Art Clokey, (1921-2009) creator of Davey and Goliath and pop culture phenomenon “Gumby,” spinning in his grave.
The IMBD (Internet Movie Database) website dilutes the anti-Christian negativity of “Orel” by describing it as, “a parody of past religious geared animated shows starring Orel, an optimistic God fearing young boy in a world of cynicism.” While the show is indeed a parody, “Orel” is anything but optimistic or God fearing.

“Orel,” whose main character is voiced by Carolyn Lawrence of Sandy (the squirrel) Cheeks, SpongeBob Squarepants fame, pushes poor taste and religious vitriol to unfathomable depths. For example, included in Orel’s “God fearing” repertoire is a special song he wrote for a school pageant – and which his church’s congregation joyfully sings – called “I hate you Jesus,” with “inspiring” lyrics that go like this:

I hate you Jesus
You rotten little fink
Your sermon never pleases
And your parables all stink

Your eyes are beady
Nose is weird
A goofy basket case
I’d like to take your stupid beard
And rip it off your face

Prancing gaily on the water
A long-haired scrawny clod
You may be someone’s daughter but
You sure ain’t the son of God…

I hate you Jesus
With your boring miracles
You smell like a hunk of cheese
That’s been shoved right up… my nose

This little ditty “playfully” opens the “Innocence” episode of Moral Orel, originally aired October 17, 2008, but rerun as recently as February 11, 2010. Difficult to comprehend the downward spiral from Davey and Goliath’s theme song, “A Mighty Fortress is Our God” to its polar opposite “Orel” and “I hate you Jesus.”

Despite the outrageous desecration of the single most sacrosanct person in Christianity, there are many who think the show has intrinsic worth. A blogger on the haha music website writes, “‘Moral Orel’ is fantastically funny, dirty, and meaningful while still maintaining a complete respect and even reverence for religion and spirituality. It’s clear that the creator of the show doesn’t hate religion, just what some people do with it.”

“A COMPLETE RESPECT AND EVEN REVERENCE FOR RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY?” Wow! One might debate the wisdom of providing internet access to insane asylums, but it would definitely be wise to up the dosage on this individual’s thorazine.

A boycott of Cartoon Network’s Moral Orel sponsors including Quiznos and Burger King may very well be in the offing for the egregious lack of propriety in airing such repugnant programming. After all, Christians, by and large, protest such nonsense peacefully, but meaningfully. By contrast, if this was a show/song about Allah or Mohammed (also Muhammad), radical Islamists could well have long ago ordered a Fatwa calling for the death of Stamatopoulos and his co-conspirators.

If one examines the dramatic difference in the way religions deal with critics, as this column will do in the near future, the evidence overwhelmingly demonstrates an enormous gulf between Christianity and Islam in this respect.

For now, the focus is upon Cartoon Network for unapologetically broadcasting this manner of compost, yet hypocritically scrubbing the more offensive episodes like “Innocence” from its “Adult Swim” website and YouTube, presumably to avoid citations in an exposé like this one.

Found at Examiner.com Little Rock Edition

http://www.examiner.com/x-16146-Wilmington-Religion–Politics-Examiner~y2010m2d12-Moral-Orel-Cartoon-Networks-assault-on-Christ

Tweet This Post

21 Responses for “‘Moral Orel,’ Cartoon Network’s Assault on Christ”

  1.            sbf2009      says:

February 18, 2010 at 10:22 am

I believe you may be intentionally misleading your audience with this critique. Your single, cherry-picked example of The Judas Song involves 2 episodes, first The School Pageant, and second Innocence. The song was written by a bitter ex member of a Christian folk band for a play he was producing for the school. Orel tries out, wishing to play Jesus, but is instead cast as Judas. He is then pressured by the writer/producer to sing this part, which Orel is very uncomfortable with, but then acquiesces and plays the part, which becomes a runaway hit with the town. In Innocence, Orel opens the episode after the song is sung by the church by addressing to the Reverend that the song should not have ever become popular and is blasphemous. The Reverend, realizing the mistake, gathers everyone back into the church, and proceeds to blame the whole event on Orel, along with many others.

The show’s main premise is of Orel’s innocence and good nature constantly pointing to true moral north, until it is perverted by his elders and their poor interpretation of what Christianity should be. The longest running joke of the show, Clay’s “65 Lost 10 Commandments”, are the best example of this. They speak on matters promoting racism, xenophobia, and excessive prudishness that do not appear in The Bible, but are seen far too often in the “Christian” culture found in 1950’s to present day America.

The show Moral Orel does not speak against Christianity in general or good Christians, just to the perversion of the Word that has developed in our culture. The creator of the show even offers his interpretation of the finale as God’s message to Orel that his life will get better. Yes, many points of the show feature blasphemy as shock value, but this is to point out the flaws in the people, not Christianity itself.

  1.            Chris says:

February 18, 2010 at 1:56 pm

Dear sbf2009,

I have to admit that I get basic cable and do not see the cartoon network.
After reading the words of the song, I don’t see how they would be allowed to be broadcast on a network for children no matter what the context. The content that you describe can be understood by children in a number of unhealthy ways.

I have talked to a few adults who have seen the show. I have yet to get a positive review. One informed me that the episode that he saw was late in the evening when children would be less likely to see it. He mentioned something called “Adultswim,” I believe. Correct me if I am wrong, but Adultswim programs consist of cartoons with adult content.

My question is, “What are the chances that these episodes will be viewed by children in the current time slots, and what guarantee is there that re-runs won’t show up when many children are watching?”
The definition of blasphemy has nothing to do with people. Secondly, a young child cannot process the intentions that you refer to in your last sentence.

The words of “The Judas Song” will cause most Christians to shut the show off.

I will attempt to watch some of the show via the internet so that I am able to make a more personal evaluation. The Wings of the Wind does not endorse or agree with every opinion expressed in every article posted on this site. It does, however, encourage a healthy and friendly debate on the issues of our day. In this case, with what I know, I’d side with the viewpoint of the article to which you responded.
We don’t see American shows treat other religions in a similar way. You won’t see a show with a song in it that says:

I hate you (name any God other than the one defined in the Bible)
You rotten little fink
Your sermon never pleases
And your parables all stink

As a Christian, I would vigorously oppose this hateful oratory.

It is not surprising that Christianity is the target these days. A reading of 1st John makes it clear that this is to be expected.

You comment, “The show’s main premise is of Orel’s innocence and good nature constantly pointing to true moral north, until it is perverted by his elders and their poor interpretation of what Christianity should be.” If the premise is the truth, why not attempt a straightforward program relating your version of true Christianity.

Lastly, It appears that someone has gone to the trouble to create this “form letter” to be sent to anyone who is offended by Moral Orel, or worse than that, to anyone concerned about how a youngster might be affected spiritually by the show.

I only wish that your energies could be put to more productive purposes.

March 1, 2010,

After watching a little of this show on YouTube, I hardly think I was cherry-picking. It is a bad show.

  1.            David says:

March 12, 2010 at 12:33 am

First, let me say that I agree with sbf2009’s post above, and secondly, I respect you very much for your well thought-out reply to it. I also appreciate your concern for the impressionable minds of children.

I can assure you that there are other shows on Cartoon Network’s late-night Adultswim block that are easily just as likely to give children wrong ideas if not more so than Moral Orel. I can also say that CN is very good about never showing any signs at all of the late night shows during daylight hours.

On a more general note, it’s true that Christianity is almost exclusively targeted in many American critiques of religion, with others such as Islam or Hinduism or Judaism only mentioned in certainly smaller doses. Christianity is a dominating force in American culture and everyone in the United States, be them Christians themselves, Atheists, Muslims, or people of other faiths, experience its influence in some way or another. I think it’s safe to say that, in a perspective of pure numbers, the practices of the various followers of Christ are most likely to be criticized. I’ll admit though that, especially on an international scale and in places like Sweden (where Lars Vilks’ 2007 cartoon drawing of Mohamed is still a hotbed of controversy) many tread with extra caution when dealing with Islam.

Anyway, back to the show. Moral Orel is an example of satire, and sometimes this genre can be more effective at convincing people than “a straightforward program relating” the beliefs of an author, for sure it has more opportunity to be comical (a trait most Adultswim programs try to pull off). The creator, Stamatopoulos, is presenting a caricature of the kind of people and behavior he strongly opposes, in order to ultimately present his opinion that while there are honest Christians in America, the religion can be corrupted to serve other, more secular, malignant motives.

And it’s fair to call it a bad show, you are entitled to your opinion, especially on matters of taste in entertainment.

  1.            explosivo says:

March 12, 2010 at 2:05 pm

This is kind of ironic.

If you had watched the show in its entirety you’d understand this show is not hating on religion but misinterpretations of said religion.

I wonder if the “misinterpretors” make those mistakes because they haven’t read the Bible completely/thoroughly?

  1.            Chris says:

March 12, 2010 at 2:30 pm

David,

I’ve received many comments about my thoughts on Morel Orel. I’ve printed 95% of reader comments until responses to this issue. People who’ve identified themselves as Christians have called me names that I didn’t want to repeat.
It is nice that someone wrote back in a civil manner. I must admit that I still haven’t seen an entire episode of the show. I’ve only seen short bits on You Tube. After the little I saw, I really don’t want to watch any more. If I get a chance, because of your civil tone, I’ll give it another look.
I grew up in an era when cartoons didn’t have an agenda. Cartoons were made for kids. Many adults watched them to get a short break from the issues of everyday life. I don’t read the Sunday Comics anymore because they are filled with political speech. (Family members will show me those that are worth reading.)
We are in absolute agreement that religion can be “corrupted to serve other, more secular, malignant motives.” Last night, I watched a 90 minute “teaching” by a lady who is currently in great demand as a speaker by Christian churches nationwide. Of the five Bible verses that were used in the lecture, given to a mostly female audience in a large church, only one was used properly. The other four were twisted to teach a concept that the Bible opposes. “Heresy” would be the term for much of the speech in days of old.
I am very critical of many current teachings being spread within church walls. My example comes from Jesus Christ. His harshest words were directed at “religious” leaders.
sbf2009 stated that “many points of the show feature blasphemy as shock value.” The little that I saw proved sbf2009 correct. I was very uncomfortable with several things that I saw and heard. I understand why many Christians have an unfavorable view.
Although we disagree about the show, I appreciate your friendly manner.

God’s blessings,

Chris

  1.            Chris says:

March 12, 2010 at 3:08 pm

Dear explosivo,

It is true that Christians make mistakes when they don’t do simple things like read a scripture in context. An example would be taking a verse out of the 10th chapter of Hebrews and making it means something it doesn’t. Generally, however, one can read the previous chapter to determine the meaning of the text. One doesn’t have to read the entire book of Hebrews, although that would be best. The best way to view any scripture, or course, in in light of the entire Bible.
Since I don’t get the Cartoon Network, I’ll make you a deal. If you email me a complete episode, or a link to a complete episode, I will watch it. Please don’t send me to the tamest episode, nor to the brashest. It would be better if you sent me three episodes. If you could do that, I will watch them and be better able to make an assessment.

God’s blessings,

Chris
Email address: chris@hswingsofthewind.com

  1.            Jessi says:

March 12, 2010 at 11:15 pm

Moral Orel is supposed to be offensive. Everything on Adult Swim is. Deal with it.
I might have a bit of sympathy for you all if it weren’t for the fact that I know many Christians that act so much like the characters on Moral Orel.

  1.            Chris says:

March 13, 2010 at 10:18 am

Dear Jessi,

This “newsblog” is compiled by one person. My name is Chris Reimers. I have not asked for sympathy from anyone. My concern is that a child might see such a program and be influenced by it. Young children are not developed enough to understand this type of material. The “Judas song” is not something to which children should be exposed.
I now know that Adult Swim is aired late in the evenings. For that I am thankful. I am saddened, however, that there is so much anger directed towards those you call Christians. The Bible identifies Christians as those who display love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, gentleness, faithfulness, goodness, and self-control. These are fruits of the Holy Spirit.
Obviously, Morel Orel focuses on folks who don’t seem to have these qualities. God will be the final judge when it comes to salvation (something I believe is based on grace), but the Bible says that we will know a person by their fruits. If the fruits aren’t evident, how can there be true belief?
I know many people who display the fruits upon which the Bible elaborates. None of them are perfect. Many of them would be shocked if they heard the “Judas Song” no matter what its purpose. That’s the truth and I suppose we are forced to deal with it.
My experience with those whose lives have been changed by Jesus Christ is that they make every effort to be kind. There are times when they must stand for issues that they believe are based on Biblical principles no matter what the cost.

God’s blessings,

Chris

  1.            Rachel says:

March 14, 2010 at 12:22 pm

If a parent lets their child watch this, then the show is not to blame, the parents are. Honestly, if I was a parent I would have better control of my children and what they watched, since the show airs at 1:00am.

Content with sexual scenes, more violence and blood than what’s shown in this show play earlier, and at times where kids can get to it, but no one says a thing about it until it hits Christianity.

Free speech is free speech, and Christianity is something that the writer of this show is close to. How better to show the problems of people within a religion than to know them yourself.

The writer of this article was not very nice at all, since any view that disagrees with his own is considered crazy:

‘“A COMPLETE RESPECT AND EVEN REVERENCE FOR RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY?” Wow! One might debate the wisdom of providing internet access to insane asylums, but it would definitely be wise to up the dosage on this individual’s thorazine.’

Only parts of the show were looked at, not all of it together. The show has been taken out of context, just like how people take parts of the bible out of context to use it for their own selfish propaganda. The people that listen and blindly follow it without getting any real evidence are just that, blind followers, and I think a large majority of people know enough symbolism to at least figure that one out.

  1.            Chris says:

March 14, 2010 at 5:01 pm

Dear Rachel,

I approved your comment a few hours ago. My program unapproved it. I have been working on a couple of things and my response to your comment. I just found that your comment had been unapproved and have re-approved it. It should stay since I am now posting a reply.

I agree with much of what you’ve written. Your first sentence is particularly true.
Your comment about sexual content and violence on television can’t be overstated. The things that we are seeing on television at all hours of the day are a reflection of the culture in which we now live.
We no longer live in a Christian nation. I base this statement on the fact that, in 100% of public school science classrooms nationwide, our kids are taught one religious view about their origins. That we came from God is not a possibility. A second reason I believe we no longer live in a Christian nation – How can a Bible believing nation allow millions of the most defenseless, the unborn, to be killed every year? These are just two of the many reasons that I believe that our nation is faltering. How can God bless a nation that has turned its back on Him?
Many Americans are Christians in spite of these facts.
I agree with you that the author of the article was irresponsible with his “dosage on this individual’s thorazine” quote.
After watching several more clips of the show, I can’t say that the entire show was “bad.” I think that the “Judas Song” was a huge mistake. As I have written before, we don’t see other religions treated similarly, even sarcastically. You won’t see a show with a song in it that says:
I hate you (name any God other than the one defined in the Bible)
You rotten little fink
Your sermon never pleases
And your parables all stink
As a Christian, I would vigorously oppose this hateful oratory.
There are limits to free speech. On this issue, one of the 10 commandments is a good place to start.
Even though I can’t say the entire show was bad, every clip that I saw was very sad.
Why would anyone stay up until 1:00 in the morning to watch such sadness?
I watched the end of episode 31 (the final show) and thought it was heartbreaking. These were the words as I heard them:
“ …and I hope I never get sober. And I hope of when you think of me years down the line, you can’t find one good thing to say. And I hope if I had the strength to walk out, you stay the h___ out of my way.”
The song stops and there’s the conversation between Orel and his Mom about Dad’s drinking.
Then the song continues…“I am drowning. There is no sight of land. You are coming down with me… Hand in unlovable hand, and I hope you die. I hope we both die.”
From my point of view this is a good illustration of our hopelessness apart from Christ. The only problem is, as far as I know, the show never makes this point.
The short bits that I did watch seemed to be more critical of an alcoholic father than Christianity; but the “Judas Song” really is indefensible.
Maybe people watch the show because they grew up in homes like the one portrayed in the show.
Every day I talk with people who grew up in homes like Orel’s. They have anger issues that go back decades.
Forgiveness is the only answer for those who have been hurt by a father like Orel’s. Hate and bitterness are not answers. I know many who have been set free from these controlling emotions by asking God to help them to forgive.
The show seems to illuminate a great deal of hurt and pain. It doesn’t seem to have any answers.

God’s blessings,

Chris

  1.            Rachel says:

March 15, 2010 at 1:50 am

Dear Chris ,

Well, on of the other sad parts about the show is that it wasn’t supposed to end on such a hopeless note, it was canceled, so the show will just air in reruns.

I think it was supposed to have a more light hearted ending if it had continued. The people were supposed to grow and change and the town was supposed to really be moral in the end.

However, while we all like to think on the bright side, there are sad things in life that should be brought to people’s attention. I think the show does a good job of that after drawing people in from the more comedic beginning season. Though, even all throughout the comedy, there was always that slight hint of sadness.

I watched the show with a friend and even as the episodes ended, we realized that there was a sort of deeper meaning than what it showed on the surface. It shows an innocent boy changed, for better or for worse. I believe for better, by some parts of the end as he moves past the conflicts that never should have been and has a happy life.

I do think that instead of the article being written in a way that completely trashes the show, that there could have been some sort of silver lining. Maybe going into how the young character tries to be good and Christian at heart, but has some problems along the way, like.. many young Christians, I’d think.

There are people who use the Gods of different religions in ways that other people wouldn’t like, but Christianity is still a large religion that people think has a large majority race in. Especially if you are of that race or religion, people accept it more than if you used satire on a religion or race that you aren’t apart of. The political correctness…. even if some of it doesn’t make too much sense

I also must say that you actually watching the entire show is a feat. That’s the least most people ask and you had an open mind going into it, or at least coming out of it. I commend you for that.

I also hope this came out making sense this early in the morning.

  1.            Chris says:

March 15, 2010 at 5:59 am

Dear Rachel,

Your thoughts on how you saw the show playing out are telling. I hope you are right. I also know about the sad things of which you write.

You’re quote about being “good and Christian at heart” says to me that you do have an understanding about what it means to be a Christian. As Christians grow they can relate more to this Bible verse: “And everyone who has this hope fixed on Him purifies himself, just as He is pure.” We continue to have a sinful nature until we die, but the fruits of the Holy Spirit become more a part of our lives as we read His Word.

I’m glad you shared that the first season had some comedy in it. Every clip that I saw was very depressing and must have come from other seasons. You Tube classified the show as a comedy. I didn’t agree with this classification after the parts that I saw.

I never did get to see an entire episode. I don’t get the Cartoon Network, so I had to rely on bits and pieces from You Tube.

God’s blessings,

Chris

  1.            Joseph says:

March 18, 2010 at 12:47 pm

Wow, Chris,

You have no idea how dilluded you sound.

I use to be like you. Religious. Dogmatic. Legalistic. Like the Apostle Paul.

Then God showed me something. It was the most amazing thing I have ever experienced. It was His love. The love that God has for all people. And it allowed me to see things in a much different light than how you are seeing things now.

Yes, Moral Orel is graphic. It is profane, but only because it speaks of the most profane thing in our existance. The warping of God’s image. Which leads people like yourself astray.

If you had the eyes to see God’s truth, you would see it quite blatantly in this show. But because you are blind, because you only see the surface of things, you cannot see the heart. And that brother is where you find the love of God.

I reccomend you read scripture. Read, brother, of David’s relationship with Absalom. Read what the wise woman says in 2 Samuel 14: 14 of God’s way, the love by which God moves. And understand that this relationshp between Father and prodigal son is thee example by which God chases after us. Even when we go against God, God loves us and seeks to save us.

When you have realized the depths of this love, it will change you. It will save you. It will transform you. It’s not magic and superstition. Its real, and its powerful. And I promise you, it will change the way you see people. Like the creators of this show.

You will stop your reckless judging of others and have compassion and mercy that is real and true, not just because it is commanded to us by Christ in the Gospel to love one another, but because you will actually love others.

May God’s Wisdom find you. And like His love, may it overwhelm you.

Joseph

  1.            Joseph says:

March 18, 2010 at 1:01 pm

Chris,

I fully know how the world works. When I person tries to express the love of God, the “devil” tries to steal the seed. I know what I wrote might be too much for you. Pride may get in your way. And the lies that fill your head, about my beloved savior Christ Jesus and God our Father… the warped image that keeps you from knowing God’s love, I know it will be hard to read, let alone understand.

But I pray, brother, you will at least read the message once and see if God will speak to your heart. Please. Read Scripture with open eyes and and open heart, and let the Word sink in.

Here is my post, one more time. Please try to read it this time:

Wow, Chris,

You have no idea how dilluded you sound.

I use to be like you. Religious. Dogmatic. Legalistic. Like the Apostle Paul.

Then God showed me something. It was the most amazing thing I have ever experienced. It was His love. The love that God has for all people. And it allowed me to see things in a much different light than how you are seeing things now.

Yes, Moral Orel is graphic. It is profane, but only because it speaks of the most profane thing in our existance. The warping of God’s image. Which leads people like yourself astray.

If you had the eyes to see God’s truth, you would see it quite blatantly in this show. But because you are blind, because you only see the surface of things, you cannot see the heart. And that brother is where you find the love of God.

I reccomend you read scripture. Read, brother, of David’s relationship with Absalom. Read what the wise woman says in 2 Samuel 14: 14 of God’s way, the love by which God moves. And understand that this relationshp between Father and prodigal son is thee example by which God chases after us. Even when we go against God, God loves us and seeks to save us.

When you have realized the depths of this love, it will change you. It will save you. It will transform you. It’s not magic and superstition. Its real, and its powerful. And I promise you, it will change the way you see people. Like the creators of this show.

You will stop your reckless judging of others and have compassion and mercy that is real and true, not just because it is commanded to us by Christ in the Gospel to love one another, but because you will actually love others.

May God’s Wisdom find you. And like His love, may it overwhelm you.

Joseph

  1.            Chris says:

March 18, 2010 at 5:55 pm

Dear Joseph,

You are very wrong. I could only wish to be like the Apostle Paul. I am not. You call me deluded and then compare me to the Apostle Paul. In my mind, this comparison would be the highest compliment.

I really don’t understand.

You say, “I used to be like you…Then God showed me something. It was the most amazing thing I have ever experienced. It was His love. The love that God has for all people. And it allowed me to see things in a much different light than how you are seeing things now.”

Would you explain how God showed you this? I would also like to know how the Apostle Paul was legalistic.

As to my reckless judgment of others, I’m not concerned about your assessment after your strange comments. If you don’t accept the words of the Apostle Paul, what part of the New Testament is from God?

I appreciate your complementary close. I wish you the same.

God’s blessings,

Chris

Also: I usually only check the blog a few times a day. If I don’t get to you within a certain time, it doesn’t mean that I am ignoring you. I reply to comments as time allows. The comments that I won’t print are the ones that I find crude or offensive to others.
This blog will go off-line on April 1. I hope you feel free to comment at my new site
https://chrisreimersblog.wordpress.com

Lastly: I have read the verse from 2 Samuel. You may not agree with what the Apostle Paul says, but I think he understood the love of God as well as anyone. An example from Ephesians 3:

14 For this reason I bow my knees before the Father,

15 from whom every family in heaven and on earth derives its name,

16 that He would grant you, according to the riches of His glory, to be strengthened with power through His Spirit in the inner man,

17 so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith; and that you, being rooted and grounded in love,

18 may be able to comprehend with all the saints what is the breadth and length and height and depth,

19 and to know the love of Christ which surpasses knowledge, that you may be filled up to all the fullness of God.

20 Now to Him who is able to do far more abundantly beyond all that we ask or think, according to the power that works within us,

21 to Him be the glory in the church and in Christ Jesus to all generations forever and ever. Amen.

  1.            John      says:

March 22, 2010 at 7:53 pm

You do know that the show was canceled ages ago and all that’s airing is reruns and it comes on at around 1 or 2 in the AM? So boycotting sponsors, not going ot work.

And one could say that one of the core themes in the show is striving to keep one’s faith and morals IN SPITE of the people you look up to or suppose to be your leader corrupting them and using them and telling that YOU are wrong when they’re the ones ignoring the message.

  1.            Chris says:

March 22, 2010 at 8:26 pm

Dear John,

Yes, I know about the cancellation. The portions of the show that I saw never articulated the core theme that you are describing. I have been told that Orel represents the type of person to which you refer. I can only speak of the parts of the show that I have seen. Anyone who keeps their faith in spite of persecution or poor influences is a person to be respected.

God’s blessings

  1.            Alani says:

March 25, 2010 at 12:24 am

Jeeze, and religious people wonder why they get made fun of so hard by everyone who dosent believe in their every way. When you overact about a show like this you only cause more people to think your just like most of the annoying versions of religious people, stuck up, shallow minded, and judgemental. It’s a show, if kids young enpugh to be persuaded by a tv show are watching adult swim, then that’s their own fault for watching something they shouldent. It’s all just a joke, the creators never said they hate jesus, so just get over it, don’t watch it, and leave the people who made it, air it, and watch it alone.

  1.            Steve says:

March 25, 2010 at 7:52 am

I have to say I am struggling with this. As a non-Christian with a large amount of respect for both Jesus and the core tenets of the religion as I see them (mostly the ‘love thy neighbor’ tune), I get a lot of sidelong responses when I try to speak honestly with Christians about… well, much of anything.

So, since you sincerely admit to knowing next to nothing about the show, I will offer two things. One is advice not to write articles on things you know nothing about (not the classiest move, btw). The other is a brief synopsis of the show and why I think it’s respectful of your faith (if not all of its followers).

Moral Orel follows the backwards capers of Orel Puppington, the only (or pretty close to it) moral character in the twisted, sad town of Moralton. While Orel tries desperately to follow the spirit of the teachings of Christianity and considers himself “Jesus’s #1 Fan!” in an innocent, childlike way, the adults of his town give either incomplete or completely backwards advice which leads him blithely- heck, EAGERLY- tromping down the wrong path.

By far, the worst perpetrator of misleading Orel is his own father, Clay Puppington. He punishes Orel for the utterly wrong things (laughably spanking Orel for using dirty slang instead of illicit drugs which lead him to use the slang in the first place) and insists on misquoting God’s Word by adding a backwards lesson at the end of many episodes in the form of The Lost Commandments (“Thou Shalt Be Ashamed of Thy Natural Anatomy”, “Thou Shalt Not Bastardize the American Language”, “Thou shalt only have sex face-to-face, man on top”, and other things). Over the course of the series, Clay is proven to be, despite his glib and confident mistellings of… everything, to be a loveless, hateful alcoholic with no responsibility over his own doings, much less ownership of the traumas he inflicts on his innocent son.

Most fans will maintain that, though your average Evangelical will shy away from it, Moral Orel doesn’t satirize Christianity in and of itself (though it happily uses such as a vehicle), but hypocrisy. The citizens of Moralton, almost to a citizen, are utterly miserable. They deny any human urges, stay in loveless, toxic relationships out of a desire to “look good” and the tyrannical “matriarch” Ms. Censordoll even browbeats young ladies into picketing their own weddings as “sinful affairs”. The only thing tying them all together is a hypocritical sneer at all behaviors deemed “unfit” paired with a moral cowardice. This is shared by just about every member of the cast (a few exceptions) except for Orel. I sincerely believe this is why -he’s- the happy one.

I even posited in a conversation the other day that we could see the show as having God’s Will as a potent force within its continuity. Every good person gets good things (a sweet lady who cares warmly for Orel gets in touch with her estranged father and forms a meaningful bond with him; Orel’s story ends happily; and Clay and Bloberta’s toxic relationship could be seen as retribution for them both hurting those in their lives meaninglessly, refusing to do -any-thing to fix it and, in fact, building the gallows for their own misery themselves).

I hope this helped. Trust me, Moral Orel is not anti-Christian. I could even argue that Orel himself is an example of what many modern Christians try to be.

  1.            Chris says:

March 25, 2010 at 9:42 am

Dear Alani,

Please read the previous comments. You are making the same basic statement that some of them did. My response to you would be the same.

This blog will be moving to https://chrisreimersblog.wordpress.com on April 1. Please feel free to comment there also.

God’s blessings

  1.            Chris says:

March 25, 2010 at 10:30 am

Steve,

I can understand if you have an issue with me posting something that I didn’t know much about. As I didn’t write the article, I don’t think you can hold me responsible for the article itself. I have posted many articles that contain information with which I’m not completely familiar. I have always thought that dialogue like this would follow if I missed something. In this case, I’m satisfied because not only have I learned something, I have had folks like you write to me who would not have otherwise.
The more I read the original article, the more I can see that the author may have overlooked some of the underlying messages in the show. I also understand how any appearance of blasphemy would bother any Christian. I would have liked more than one article on Christian sites relating to the show. I’m glad I ran into this one though since I would never have been aware of Orel otherwise.
Thanks for your take on the show. Sadly, it sounds like the world we live in today. I know that you think that Moral Orel is not anti-Christian. Nevertheless, we Christians (I include myself here) need to take a very hard look in the mirror. We have to start reading our Bibles again. Entire denominations are walking away from what used to be considered simple truth.
I think I have received many comments on this post because, unfortunately, many can relate to Orel. It’s a “look out for #1″ world. As a Christian, this is no surprise; 1 John chapter 5, among many other passages, gives us a good sense that things would be this way.
Yes, your effort was helpful. When you put together your own blog, please send me the address. I particularly find truth in your comment about how people who treat others badly are only building their own gallows. There is a scripture that articulates this: “You reap what you sow.”
This blog will be moving to https://chrisreimersblog.wordpress.com beginning April 1st. I hope you can check in occasionally.

God’s blessings…

Advertisements

15 Responses to MORAL OREL?

  1. Mannyr says:

    What a post! No more ‘Moral Orel,’ Please. It is sad to see the extent of the brain-washing of them that sit in darkness.

    • Chris says:

      Life is sad enough without most of the characters I remember in the show. Where are the fruits of the Spirit of which the Bible speaks? Love, Joy, Peace, Patience, Kindness, Goodness, Gentleness, Faithfulness and Self-Control: these are fruits that godly people display. We are all sinners and fall short of the glory of God, but the fruits should be evident in a Christian.

      Always appreciate your comments, Manny.

  2. I almost never leave responses, but after reading through a few of the comments on MORAL OREL?
    | Wings of the Wind. I actually do have a few questions for you if it’s allright. Is it only me or do some of these remarks look like they are left by brain dead individuals? 😛 And, if you are posting on other places, I’d like to follow you.
    Would you post a list of the complete urls of your
    shared sites like your twitter feed, Facebook page or linkedin profile?

    • Chris says:

      Welcome to Wings of the Wind, Can I still grow.

      I don’t have a twitter feed or a linkedin profile. I do have a facebook page. If you type in “Chris Reimers Hot Springs Arkansas” you will probably find me.

      I Hope you subscribe to the blog.

      It is always nice to have someone new comment. I hope you come back.

      God’s blessings…

  3. Matthew Allen says:

    Chris:

    I came here to read what absurdity the article may contain, admittedly biased in assuming absurdity just because it was a Christian take on this excellent show. While my assumption of the AUTHOR was correct, I was struck by your comments & utterly taken aback by your open-minded approach when further exploring the true timbre of Moral Orel. I had a long-winded comment ready to synopsize the real meaning of the show but found I did not need to post it, thankfully.

    I will just add one thing that I’ve not seen mentioned, and that is juxtaposition. When creating a series that explores the shortcomings of our society as a whole, and especially when attempting to actually portray society’s metaphorical veil wearing thin as the skeletons are pulled from the closet, there is probably not a better “starting point” for this fall from grace backslide than a devout Christian community/household, at least in the eyes of the American public. While hypocrisy, vice, and corruption are endemic to all humans regardless of creed, this show just would not have been as powerful if set in the secular world, which is wrought with & somewhat proud of these detriments. Many of the events that unfold are quite shocking, and I think that is due to the Christian morality the characters OUTWARDLY portray. There is more to unravel; a greater distance to fall… In my opinion, this was the motivation for using Christianity, not to belittle it.

    One could point to the superficial events in the show & claim the show is demeaning the religion, but more poignantly I think one could make the claim that the show is actually singing the praises of the core tenants of Christianity. Despite the awful environment & role models Orel (the only character who seems to embrace his religion with gusto) grew up with, he still hangs on to his faith. He does not let it jade him in the end, and the series closes showing Orel to be happy, healthy, and unbroken by that which he has lived through. He kept his faith & his faith carried him through the storm… Quite inspirational, albeit in a very depressing way.

    I just wanted to add my 2 cents on the series, but more than anything I wanted to let you (Chris) know how refreshing it is to be reminded that Christians do not have to be close-minded, stubborn, and ignorant. You made excellent, well-articulated points, seemed eager to hear a contradictory opinion, and more importantly you handled the critical comments with grace. I’m not used to seeing that… I grew up Christian, surrounded by seemingly good people in a theological environment that I truly enjoyed until my late teens. But as I began to question, the true nature of those “great” people came out, attempting to stifle any free-thought or deviation from what their interpretation of a being a “good Christian person” meant. I had to leave it behind in order to feel I could be myself & it left a bad taste in my mouth. Not the dogma itself, but those whom practice it, which has undoubtedly led to prejudice on my part. Something I am not proud of. So thank you for reminding me that the negative qualities I referenced are not inherent to the teachings themselves, but that the practitioners that espouse said qualities seem to be the ones that grab all the attention & have the biggest mouths, just as is true with all sociological groups.

    By the way, tragedies are not for everyone, but if you enjoy them you should really watch this series. It is definitely inappropriate for children, probably even adolescents. It is very sad at times, but the writing & creativity that went into the show is incredible, and regardless of one’s beliefs as long as it is approached with an open-mind there is much to be gained from the experience. It truly is art.

  4. Chris says:

    Welcome to The Wings of the Wind, Matthew, and thank you for your kind words.

    I was not surprised by the responses I received from this post. In fact, I was expecting more of a reaction. Then again, this blog is only followed by 140 people (now), so my contacts are limited.

    My goal is not followers or hits, but to discover truth. As you know, Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth and the life…”

    I also grew up in a Christian home, but I came to my own conclusions when it came to faith. A true Christian will not “stifle any free-thought or deviation from what their interpretation of a being a ‘good Christian person’ means.”

    You know that I would not call this show an “excellent” show as you have. However, I do think it is something that can begin a conversation about what a true Christian is. A true Christian is a Christ follower, someone who believes that they are a sinner saved by God’s grace alone.

    I agree with your statement: ” It is definitely inappropriate for children, probably even adolescents.”

    Because of the creative and sarcastic nature of the show, I think your statement is true.

    As you know, I offered more than once to watch full episodes of the show. I never received a reply by any of those who commented. I still have basic cable and don’t get the Cartoon Network. I’m assuming the show is still airing because of your post.

    The only YouTube links that I could find were bits and pieces of the show. I haven’t looked in awhile, and I will look right after I make this comment to see if I can locate any.

    If you have a link, please share it here.

    I made a deal with a person called “explosivo” (in the earlier comments) that:

    “Since I don’t get the Cartoon Network, I’ll make you a deal. If you email me a complete episode, or a link to a complete episode, I will watch it. Please don’t send me to the tamest episode, nor to the brashest. It would be better if you sent me three episodes. If you could do that, I will watch them and be better able to make an assessment.”

    This deal still stands.

    Thank you for your thoughtful statement, Matthew. I consider you to be a “truth-seeker” like myself. I hope you continue to check out my blog once-in-a-while.

    God’s blessings…

    I’m off to check out You Tube Links. I will share comments here if I can locate a full episode.

    • Chris says:

      NVM, Matthew. I’ve found the website and am watching an episode called “Honor.”

      I liked it that the site included a disclaimer that the show was “unsuitable for children under 17.”

      Unfortunately, the highlighted video dealt with Orel masturbating at his school.

      I chose “Honor” because it had the most views.

      God’s blessings…

      • Chris says:

        I always thought the episodes were 1/2 hour long. “Honor” was under 6 minutes in length.

        The episode (13) begins with Orel’s father having a drink with a “friend.” The male friend and “Dad” are about to kiss when and elderly woman walks in. The male “friend” sees Orel’s dad kissing the woman and he runs outside and throws up. Evidently, Moral’s Dad is running for a political office. His poster is up in town.

        In the episode, Orel is trying to find a way to honor his Father. His Father’s friend, a school coach, tells Orel that his Dad should be honored because he had Orel for a son. Orel’s Dad takes the “family” caroling and they end up and the friend’s house where Orel is helping with Christmas decorations.

        Orel’s Father accuses the friend of raping his son, and after telling his friend that he loves him several times, Orel’s Dad leaves with the family. The episode ends with Orel picturing a perfect family of his own.

        My comment:

        The episode primarily deals with the issues of homosexuality and the 5th commandment. At the end, Orel seems to have found no way to honor his father. Christians would quote 1 Cor. 6 to explain that homosexuality is, indeed, a sin. As Christians, we are to love the sinner and hate the sin. The end seems to depict a dream that gives Orel hope in the midst of the misguided lives of the people around him, including the town preacher.

        I was the 288,852nd view. I will watch another, and comment, as time allows.

        • Matthew Allen says:

          Hello again, and thank you for the thoughtful response. It’s funny you mentioned seeking truth, as I got the same impression of you from your posts on this article. From what little I do know about our existence on this earth, it’s that truth and the acquisition of knowledge & wisdom is among our greatest purpose, at least at this plane of existence. Unfortunately, it seems fewer and fewer people see the nobility in this, opting instead for media & sexual distractionism or partaking in fashionable consumption. It really is sad, but the upshot is that it makes it all the more refreshing to find others that share the same zeal. And thank you for the warm welcome; I very much like what you are doing here, and even though I do not agree with some of the content, I welcome the chance for respectful, intelligent discourse.

          For the easier quicker comments:

          To answer the running-time question, the show, with commercials, ran for 15-minutes. Did it really only run for 6 minutes? I would have guessed 9-12min, but maybe I’m wrong. I’ll have to look into that, as maybe it is possible that the site you watched it from did not provide the entire episode? It is definitely short though, so I would guess you saw it’s entirety, but I will check.

          I did see your offer to another poster about finding a link to the shows. While I am unaware of any sites that are currently streaming the series in its entirety (although maybe the one you found does), I would gladly upload the series to a cloud-storage site that would either allow you to stream it directly from the site or download it at the very least.

          As to the content of the episodes and my comment on it being “excellent” I would like to clarify what I mean by this:

          I consider the show excellent from a strictly emotional & artistic viewpoint. The topics dealt with & how they are presented, is to me, secondary to the true point of the show, which is to show the trials & tribulations of life in this time & space; the human condition, regardless of the circumstances, beliefs, and catalysts that bring out that which lies underneath all that we consciously believe we truly are, and especially the image we outwardly project to the world.

          My Biblical acuity is not exactly honed these days, but I guess I would put it in terms of “all people are sinners” (terrible paraphrase, I know, but I think you understand what I am saying). No matter how piously one lives their life, whether one is able to ward-off all vice & become, for all intents and purposes, “saintly”, it very much requires a proactive approach. Maybe there are exceptions to this, but for the average human being a good & purposeful life does not come naturally. I am not sure if this is contradictory to scripture on human-nature so I cannot speak to this end, but I know in my own life when striving to be the best person that I can be I have to TRY. I have to fight temptation and actively make an effort to be as charitable, forgiving, understanding, and humble as I can possibly be. If I let the monotony of day-to-day life detract from what is actually important, I begin to regress back in terms of being “lesser” of a being. I believe this to be true for us all. If we let our guard down & just “go through the motions” so-to-speak, we open ourselves up to the possibility of evil/vice/immorality gaining a foothold in our being, with further complacency allowing it to fester & grow to abominable depths. I see the show as portraying this both on a personal/individual level, as well as our community/society as a whole, the latter of which being much more destructive & poignant in this time.

          This is what I believe the show does so incredibly well. It is a shocking look into the abysmal depths that can lie beneath the surface, and in my opinion serves as a cautionary tale for both Christians and the human race at large, reminding us how dangerous complacency can be in all facets of our lives, but especially in the spiritual & moral realm. This is why I deem the show to be so powerful and well-done. So by “excellent” I was in no way glorifying the events & situations that the show presents, but the portrayal of the emotional/spiritual implications engaging in such behavior (or complacent lack of proactivity) has upon us, with “us” being those that experience such depths as well as the viewers’ emotional engagement in the story-arc. Does that makes sense? haha (Im kind of scatter-brained at the moment so I can clarify my point if it is not discernible).

          I’ve got much more to say on this & will finish my thoughts in the next post.

          Take care

          • Chris says:

            Hi Matthew.

            You are welcome for the response and I would like to thank you for responding in such an articulate and friendly manner. This is the type of discourse that I seek on this blog. We may differ from each other, but what is the point of mudslinging and name-calling that ends so many conversations. Neither person learns anything.

            It seems that you are a very moral person. As you have written: “…when striving to be the best person that I can be I have to TRY.” I understand this well and, as you know, the Christian asks for the Holy Spirit’s help. I would be the first to admit that I don’t always remember to ask God for His help as I should.

            I understand now what you mean by the word “excellent.” What you stated about this makes perfect sense to me. I can understand how one could appreciate “the portrayal of the emotional/spiritual implications engaging in such behavior (or complacent lack of proactivity) has upon us,” without “glorifying the events & situations that the show presents.” I think you put that very well.

            Thank you for your offer to upload the series to a cloud-storage site. I don’t think that will be necessary. I went back and looked for the site I saw the episode I commented on and couldn’t find it. However, I found quite a few episodes, including the first one (22 minutes). That is the next episode I plan to watch. The show I saw was 6 minutes long and seemed like an entire episode. It was episode 13. I’m sure a large amount of the original content could have been edited out.

            You had a good question when you wrote:

            “Maybe there are exceptions to this, but for the average human being a good & purposeful life does not come naturally. I am not sure if this is contradictory to scripture on human-nature so I cannot speak to this end…”

            I know it is not written as a question but I’ll take it as such. The Bible teaches that all men have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God. We are born with a sinful nature, so I think the conclusion you have come to is true based on the scriptures.

            Your quote about “the possibility of evil/vice/immorality gaining a foothold in our being, with further complacency allowing it to fester & grow to abominable depths” makes you sound more Christian than many of the “Christians” I know.

            The word “Christian” is used quite loosely these days.

            I must admit that I am not a Bible scholar, just a simple believer. I like that you mentioned humility. Jesus said, “Apart from Me you can do nothing.” It is a very humbling verse. On the flip side, I know that each human has tremendous value because of what Jesus did on the cross. It is this balance with which the Christian struggles. Knowing of our great worth in His eyes and staying humble is the pendulum upon which we swing. No one is perfectly balanced. Because of our sinful nature we can be prideful at times. I will never understand God’s unconditional love completely. How could I? I wasn’t the One who took the entire sins of the world on my shoulders. At the same time, I think believing in that love to the degree that we can should make us feel a sense of humility.

            I appreciate your comments, Matthew. And FYI, when someone asks me where to start in the Bible I always tell them to start in the book of Matthew. Many recommend John. John is a very deep book, whereas I think God used Matthew’s tax-collector mentality to share “the facts.” There are parables in Matthew, but they are explained. Any of the Gospels are good, but I like Matthew. Jesus looked at him and said, “follow Me.” Without hesitation, it seems, Matthew left his post and followed Jesus the rest of his life. He is a good example of a disciple.

            I will probably not get to the next episode until next weekend sometime. Until then, thanks for the civil “discussion” and I hope you have a great week.

            God’s blessings…

  5. Chris says:

    Hi Matthew and those of you who are interested in “hearing” my thoughts about Moral Orel.

    I watched 2 videos last night. I tried to watch the first episode but they wanted $1.99 for it and I won’t pay, at this point, to watch Moral Oral. God has provided for me in many ways, but money is tight these days.

    The first episode I watched was some guy’s top five from season three. It is after church on Sunday P.M, and I’m reviewing what I saw last night.

    Because of the graphic nature and the words that the poster used, I can’t put a link on my blog.

    His #5 is an episode called “Dumb.” There isn’t a clip but he describes what’s happening. Pictured (I think) is a guy named Joe. Evidently the poster, lowellnarutofan, liked the episode because Joe beat gay kids with a bat in season 1.

    All who have read this blog knows my position on homosexuality. A true Christian would never beat a gay person of any type with a baseball bat. The poster blames Joe’s behavior on several family issues, each of them unacceptable in my view. He also says something about Joe beginning a good relationship with his mother, another thing he likes.

    Lowellnarutofan says that this is one of only two episodes with good endings in the entire season.

    His #4 episode is called “Help.” It is a flashback of bloberta and why she married Clay. Unfortunately, I think the writers got this one right. So much of the world is like this today. The sins of the Fathers/Mothers are “visited” on children. Lowellnarutofan calls the episode “tragic.” I couldn’t agree more.

    #3 is called “Passing.” “L” calls it another flashback into Clay’s past. I guess, as a youngster, Clay pretended to shoot himself with a gun. Clay’s Mom has a heart attack and his Dad blames him for it and leaves. Again, it is unfortunate that things like this do happen in the real world.

    #2 is called “Honor.” I guess this was the final episode of the show, which I have discussed earlier in this thread. “L” calls it “the best final episode ever because it provides closure.” He says that Orel’s entire family is destroyed but the season ends on a good note when Orel marries (dreams?) his childhood sweetheart, Christina.

    “Ls” #1 episode wasn’t surprising after the language and clips he showed in the upload.

    The clip is of an episode called “alone.” This is the only one of the 5 with real clips of the show.

    A young female, dressed like a nurse enters a room looking for “Hubby.” Hubby is a stuffed bear. She puts two stuffed animals in seats at a table and tells them that she did some work for the principal at the school even though there were no classes. She changes into some “adulty” clothes and talks about setting a good example. She takes some sandwiches and milk out of the refrigerator and sets them in front of her “family.” A prayer is said. It isn’t the worst prayer in the world and includes some good requests.

    And then it happens. Some mustard gets spilled on the floor and the young blond (yellow hair really) begins to clean it up. As she is cleaning she accidentally knocks Huggy onto her bottom and spills some milk. Most youngsters (I think) wouldn’t understand it, but the main character assumes that she has been sodomized by Huggy. She says: “Don’t treat me like that, not like everyone, not you.”

    Needless to say, I should have stopped there but I watched another short clip called “Not a Jew Anymore.” Orel is trying out for some sort of play it seems, and a young Jewish boy follows him. The boy sings a song that is theologically incorrect because the song states that Jesus is not a Jew anymore (The boy plays the part of Jesus). When Jesus died and rose again, it didn’t stop his ties to Judaism.

    Of course the director of the play takes credit for his great song writing abilities.

    My comment:

    There is no question that life has its sad moments. We just read Ecclesiastes 3 today in church which states that there are good days and bad ones.

    Unfortunately, much of the show reflects the culture in America. I know a 50+ man who was sodomized as a 16 year old. He has had to take anger management classes at a Christian parenting center to help him try and forgive the man (now deceased).

    I think the guy who put up the top 5 is a nasty fellow. His language and clips speak for themselves.

    I also think that many of the viewers of Moral Orel have had similar experiences as the man I mentioned above. I’m sure all haven’t, but we’ve all had bad things happen to us and, as Christians, we have to ask God to help us forgive.

    Again, I wasn’t impressed with what I saw. It is only a reflection of our warped culture. There is a possibility that the show could cause some adult to seek help like my friend did. This is my hope.

  6. You are a brave and godly man Chris, and not afraid to tackle hard issues. May the Lord bless you and keep you as you serve him faithfully. In Christ’s love, Sherryn

    • Chris says:

      Thank you very much for your kind words, Sherryn.

      This is a post from my original blog and, as you can see, it got quite a bit of notice. I don’t know if this show is still playing, but I know there are things on that are similar. I think the show was running in re-runs when this was posted. I was surprised at how many defended this show. There was enough on You Tube to make me feel sad for those who did watch the show. I think that many of the viewers had similar experiences in real life and were drawn to Morel.

      Again, thank you for your kind words and I know that I am not the only one tackling hard issues (I’ve seen your blog.).

      May God give us wisdom as we work with the society of our day.

      God’s blessings..

      • Thank you for re-posting my article Chris. I just happened upon your blog and found it here. There was indeed an overwhelming response to this article, including, (allegedly) one from the creator of that contemptible series Moral Orel.

        I actually happened upon the show quite by chance as well. I was for a period suffering from chronic insomnia and very late on night just happened to stop upon Cartoon Network in the midst of the “I Hate You Jesus” song. I subsequently was able to view the entire episode and a couple others to be certain that I was correct in my assessment of just how vile the show really is.

        Contrary to the misguided individuals who claimed I was taking things out of context and misleading my audience, it is every bit as bad as I propose.

        Take care and God bless,

        Keith A. Wimer
        Examiner.com

        • Chris says:

          I’m so glad that you stumbled upon my reblog. In any context a song called “I Hate You Jesus” tells a lot about the program it’s in. You can see I got quite a response myself and you can see my effort to find any good in what I did see. Actually, I wish I had seen more, but I refused to pay to watch the show so I had to rely solely on what was on You Tube. At one time, I thought there was quite a lot but, as it turned out, there were fewer parts of episodes that are available than I expected. I really never saw an entire episode. What I did watch, as a Christian, was very sad.

          I appreciate your effort to get the truth about the show out there. I’m glad that you had a chance to give your opinion here as many here disagreed with your article. Many tried to find something good from the show. I haven’t had a chance to go back and read this entire thread and will do it eventually to remember what I wrote.

          Many cartoons today certainly aren’t like the original Gumby or Scooby Doo with which I grew up. Even those shows ended up with mystical characters if I remember correctly. Thank you for the article. It created dialog. Much of that dialog was unfruitful, but hopefully someone learned something.

          God’s blessings…

          You are always welcome here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: